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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 7
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be senator blumenthal from connecticut. we are so delighted that you could be here. go right ahead. >> thank you very much. i want to thank you and ranking member and half for today's hearing. my colleagues to have stated so eloquently what happened in new york and new jersey, connecticut , share their faith although the lack -- national media coverage may give the impression that connecticut's damage was more a footnote to the main story. in fact, the destruction and damage in connecticut was every bit as real, and the pockets of destruction as pervasive as elsewhere, and i think many of the lessons learned the you heard here form a pattern that we need to invest now or pay later. there are measures that we can take now to minimize the damage in the future, and we cannot be penny wise to avoid those measures going forward, and the other lesson that i think it's striking here is that our efforts have to be complementary, not competitive. we are mutually supportive in this effort. i have been asked repeatedly, argue in competition with new jersey and new york? the answer is emphatically now.
of the civilian pension connecticut affect medicaid and lots of other programs like that and the budget cut likes the idea because it saves money. it doesn't save that much at first but it saves a lot of money over time and i guess a little for to entered the league in the first ten years and more after that the savings continue to grow and grow. advocates for older americans don't like this idea very much at all because the savings are so big that means they are getting less money each month and in their benefits each year. >> so there's the question of what it means for the retirees beneficiary right now in the next couple of years and the on going into the future and then the president sending the measure of what would mean across the government. what do democrats think of this? you mentioned might be amenable to it but what about the house democrats, where do they stand? >> you had congressman larsen on here and you heard what he said not including social security and peace talks. that is a common belief of opinion among the democrats on the hill and in both the senate and house of would be a
york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affected damaged areas, we need to make that expenditure now. but we need to pay for that over the longer term. so to that extent, yes, it will be part of the -- for my own standpoint, part of the math that will have
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and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he promptly declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6.7 mil
to participate with your involvement and out reach to your communities its but also connecticut and going back through 2011 and the catastrophe suffered during that period of time when you contacted me. i went them to know. thank you to senator vitter as well. also to the president to provide the strong leadership that he has and promptly declared connecticut in the regency arianna and permitted the sba to move forward with fema and i want to think those folks, those on the ground who have been there for quite some time, and fema officials in advance of the storm. many of the recent storms indicate we may face a new normal of this catastrophic weather evaded the event. we need to prepare it -- prepare long-term and short-term and that is why the suggestions and other improvements are so critically important. you need to know the connecticut sba office has approve 6.7 million of disaster assistance for struggling businesses. that figure is significant but there is a large number of requests for funding. there for a large number of homeowners need assistance for the request quite frankly is in t
to the folks in connecticut. having experienced not as large but a similar with representative deferreds who sat next to me on the floor of the senate our hearts and thoughts got to them. even though the secretary of state is the chief election officials in arizona, the real work mostly is, the county level. within our 15 counties we have the election directors who are very bipartisan, multi partisan coming and work across party lines with them, their counties and across the county lines to try to make sure that every arizonan that is eligible to vote gets to vote. we have a very dedicated people what the county levels since kind of a misnomer to say the chief elections officials is that the state and people get the idea of the state wins elections and it's really the counties to the arizona has been served very well by having local officials elected by their friends and neighbors in those counties and communities that conduct the elections and they are more than anyone else interested in making sure that all of their citizens who aren't eligible to vote get the right to do so and make it as
in connecticut, many parents are frustrated with the federal government and expressed concerns to politicians at a town hall meeting. >> we go from one to another. we go from fema to our homeowners. our homeowners insurance offered me $150. what can i do with that? >> fema ain't doing nothing. still they keep going around in a circle and they go, denied. denied. >> evacuees are thankful for having a place to sleep, but say living conditions in shelters are cramped and very nice to have space for the kids to be running around. the founder of camp tlc that you heard from just a moment ago, plans to be here and serve these kids as long as the families are in shelters and as long as she has enough funding. if you would like to donate, go to www.jdaf.org. >> rick: thanks >> arthel: new concerns over student loan debt in the u.s. as it nears the $1 trillion mark. it's raising questions about similar loan practices that contributed to the subprime mortgage crisis. take a look at the numbers now. last quarter, student debt hit $956 billion. 11% of that is now seriously delinquent. surpassing the ra
that was wrought throughout new york, new jersey, connecticut. we are still suffering gravely. there are still families that cannot return to their homes. there are businesses in the early stages of figuring out how to rebuild. the were so many lives lost so many families torn apart. i can tell you this is the job of the federal government. it isur job to protect people. it is our job to help communities rebuild when there are natural disasters that local governments just can't afford to be able to pay for on their own. now, new york has been working very hard to come up with a plan about how to rebuild. but the transportation infrastructure has taken an unbelievable beating. in new york alone, 2,000 miles of roads were destroyed or damage 11 tunnels were flooded. and our -- our city and our state really relies on mass transit. we are the number one users of mass transit in the country. and with our mass transit system, miles of tracks and tunnels were flooded with corrosive saltwater. 12 subway ations were damaged or destroyed, 500,000 transit riders are still experiencing severe disruptions.
, and eight in connecticut, many parents in the area are just at wit's end trying to make life normal for their kids as they live in shelters. that's what camp tlc is doing, together living with a challenge. they've just wrapped up their third week of camp sandy and they've had a lot of fun. it was carnival day. as parents are leaving with their children, they're allowed to stop by here, this distribution center and pick up nonperrishables and other necessities. earlier this morning, about 10:00 o'clock, a bus driver picked up about 30 kids and many of their parents as well from a shelter here in staten island and took them to gateway academy. kids from ages four to 16 share their stories, do sing alongs, arts and crafts, and burn off their energy. parents can either participate in camp activities or run errands, talk to insurance companies and find more permanent places for their kids to sleep at night. >> short-term, i think it's giving parents respite, letting parents know they can rebuild their lives and their kids are in good hands. i think long-term, it's teaching kids that ther
not be sting ired >> astood in the cold connecticut air, touched with the souls of the sweet infants inurned -- understood the christ child. they're so young, who will great them at the door? we said our goodbyes and i prayed for the spirit of olivia engel, who was to be an angel in the christmas pageant. on that day i prayed that the families, if they were believers, would draw on that faith, too. and then it came to me. i wanted a hug and reawe sure them that the strongest, most nurturing garden of fallen angels i know, my open lost father, would be standing among those at the gates of heaven to 0 lovingly take the children by the hand to introduce them to their new friend forever, the christ child named jesus, born in a little town called bethlehem >> as we left newtown were we more hopeful when we arrived. we passed a shrine for the children, and as the sky turn from red to blue, the radio playedded ang yells on high. on christmas day, the carolina will be sung >> we wish you a blessed, joyful and hopeful christmas. cooking a christmas morning casserole. and from youtube sensation to a m
moment as i stood in the cold connecticut air and touched by the souls of the sweet spotless stainless infants i understood the reality of the renewal and sanctifying grace of the christ child. i reminded the audience and myself what dr. king had said death is not a blind alley but an open door. but i also worry they are so young. who will greet them at that door? we said our good byes and i prayed for the spirit of olivia ingle who was to be an angel in the christmas pageant. on that day i summoned my shaken faith and prayed that the families if they were believers would draw on that faith, too. and then it came to me, i wanted a hug and reassure them that the strongest, most nurturing garden of fallen angels i know my own lost father would be standing among those at the gates of heaven to lovingly take the children by the hand to introduce them to their new friend forever the christ child named jesus born in a little town called bethlehem. >> as we left newtown, we were more hopeful than when we arrived. we past a shrine to the children which included christmas toys. as the sky turne
happening again. >> and mr. fugate. >> yes, i think we show that in new jersey, new york, connecticut, other areas where we have used a flood insurance map programs to illustrate risk and homes were elevated, many of them had minimal damage and were able to be reoccupied when the power game back. homes that weren't built elevated were oftentimes heavily damaged or destroyed that's not going to be the answer in dense populated areas like lower masht. as we have seen with new orleans sometimes system-wide mitigation may be a more effective strategy than structure by structure. i caution about going underground. if i seem to remember everything in manhattan was underground including the hospital entire imaging room and emergency room that was flooded by salt water. where does it make sense to talk about it on a homeowner's basis and where does it talk about we have look at hardining or mitigating a part of the a community that piece by piece -- the overall impact. i think secretary donovan and other federal agencies we work with the local and the state and with the science community. as the cha
this kind of damage. >> i the weekend showed that in new jersey, connecticut, and other areas where we use the flood insurance map programs and homes or elevated, many of them had a minimal damage and were able to be read occupied one power that came back. -- homes not elevated were often destroyed. city-wide mitigation may be more effective strategy. i would also caution about going underground. everything in manhattan was underground including hospitals and emergency room that were flooded by salt water and destroyed. where does it make sense to talk about this on a homeowner basis? where is this talk that we will have to look at mitigating a part of a community that piece by piece will not address the overall impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit,
connecticut, maryland, some of the other states that were hit as well. what is your number that you put out in your testimony? >> there are the firms that we have looked at from the population information that were in the primary disaster area. these are the ones that incurred the worst of the storm. >> how do these jive with the fema numbers? >> the theme and numbers include primary and secondary areas. they had significant disruption of businesses, but not as much physical disaster in our estimation. >> different numbers for new jersey and new york, what would your numbers be for new jersey? and if you would give those for the record, my other question is, if you do your normal business with 24 regional centers and 35 out reach offices, how do you handle a surge? if you are processing the daily requirements, they have got to be less than 10% of the pressures that you are feeling now, how are you not surging your capacity to take care of the requests that must be flying out right now? >> what we did immediately was exhaust my annual travel budget by transferring people into the impact area
in with the news of a massacre of innocent children in newtown, connecticut, followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator danny inouye so i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with a heavy heart for those who have been lost just in the last few days. i do want to thank the people of texas for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both benches on both sides of this room are filled with my staff members who have been so hardworking and so loyal and have produced so much in 20 years for our state and nation, and i thank them. i do want to thank my colleagues and all the people who work here -- senators, but also those who work behind the scenes to make our lives as good as they can be with the hard hours that we all have. those who keep our buildings safe and clean, who work in the libraries, the shops, the cafeterias, and who guide tens of thousands of tourists through our nation's beautiful capitol each year. i want to thank my husband ray and our tw
. it is critical to remember that the new york-new jersey region, including connecticut, accounts for over 10% of the gdp of the country, well in excess of $1 trillion. protecting that and the tax revenues to the federal, state, and local governments that that economy generates is critical. that wealth-creating sector was basically shut down for days and in some cases by weeks by the storm appeared building to the standards in effect the day before the storm would peak in possible but also cost ineffective. rebuilding a system at the hoboken caissons would be impossible to do. last week research suggested their return from mitigation spending, especially with respect to flooding, is a national return of 5 to 1, a 14% return. given that these are long-lived transportation infrastructure assets, the return to the local, state, and federal governments of mitigation spending will be substantial, but will also protect this huge part of the nation's economy. >> senator, at the risk of repeating what has been say, i think, clearly, that mitigation is critical. we cannot just rebuild what was there,
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)